designer spotlight

Designer Spotlight: Erin Dollar

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Hello, please introduce yourself:

My name is Erin Dollar, and I’m a textile designer and surface pattern designer in San Diego, California. I launched Cotton & Flax, my collection of patterned textile home goods in 2012, and I opened my first retail shop last year!

Have you always wanted to be a designer/illustrator?

Not exactly! Like all kids, I was very creative when I was young, but I was part of the generation that watched Free Willy and immediately decided to be a marine biologist when I grew up. My creative side was at a soft simmer during my teenage years, and I took a lot of art and craft classes, including painting, ceramics, and photography. I had planned to major in Environmental Studies in college, but when I discovered the printmaking department, it was all over for me… I never wanted to leave. Discovering my creative passion as a newly minted adult sealed my fate, in a way.

How did you come to the current point you are at in your career?

When I first started working as an artist, I was working part-time jobs, and spending every spare minute in the studio. I would contribute art to gallery shows, and sell my work on Etsy -- at that point it looked more like a side hustle. I brought my artwork to some craft fairs, and the enthusiasm from shoppers encouraged me to put more work into my creative business, and consider the possibility that it could become my full time job.

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Cotton & Flax began as a series of experiments with printing my artworks on fabric, which I built into a full collection. Making utilitarian goods really appealed to me, and by honing my sense of pattern design, it helped me create a distinct style for my work. As the business grew, I’ve partnered with brands on pattern licensing projects. As I continue to grow as an artist, these partnerships and collaborations allow me to experiment, and grow in new directions!

What is your design process?

All my patterns begin as ink drawings. I use sumi ink to draw/paint a pattern onto smooth paper, and then scan and edit in photoshop. I am certain that there are easier ways to design simple patterns, but I find that working on an iPad or computer to start makes my patterns feel too “perfect.” It takes away some of the charm of the hand drawn line.

My design process is usually centered around creating a pattern for a specific product, so I’m brainstorming color choices, and thinking about how the texture of the fabric will affect the design. For client projects, I’m often working from a design brief, so I am thinking about the best way to communicate the idea of the design through my minimalist modern lens.

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What does a typical day look like for you?

I have a design studio in San Diego that’s part retail shop, which is where I work from most days. I arrive in the morning, check emails, package and ship out orders from my online shop, and then the afternoon is spent working on admin or design projects. On a good day, I get to grab coffee down the street with a friend or client, and brainstorm new creative projects.

When you feel stuck or in a design rut, how do you get yourself out of it and back on track?

I try to rest, and not beat myself up too much. Experimenting with a new technique or medium tends to help shake things up a bit.

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What has been/have been some of your favourite design projects to date?

I’m very proud of the design work I’ve done for Cotton & Flax. Being in charge of the entire process, start to finish, is a huge undertaking, and I often forget to celebrate that fact!

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I’ve created two fabric collections for Robert Kaufman Fabrics, Arroyo and Balboa. Both are overprinted on linen fabrics, much in the same way that I create work for Cotton & Flax, which has made this a dream partnership for me.

I created a collection of stationery for Scout Books, a company in my hometown of Portland, Oregon, that focuses on creating the coolest notebooks from recycled materials.

One of my favorite commissions from 2018 was a pair of silk scarves that I designed for Deseda. This was one of my first fashion collaborations, and it was so exciting when the samples arrived in my mailbox!

If you could go back 10 years and give your younger self one key piece of advice or an insight, what would it be?

Try to slow down and enjoy your successes more. Find as many like-minded creative folks to collaborate with as possible, and be generous with your time. Sleep more, and wear sunscreen.

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There has been an art supply sanction imposed and designers are only allowed to possess 3 items/tools, what do you choose?

Oooh, that’s a tough one! My first two are staples of all my design projects these days: sumi ink, and smooth bristol paper. Almost every pattern in my collection has started with those two tools. I guess my practical side would pick my computer as the third tool… but that’s boring! Instead, I’ll say my Case for Making watercolors, which feel so special and rare to me that I treat them like gold.


Where do you find inspiration?

Walking! I believe that so much of being an artist and a designer is just noticing things, little details that others might miss. When I go on a walk, my brain stops whirring over all the items on my to-do list, and let’s me just daydream and observe.

Which designers, artists or individuals truly inspire you (past or present, living or dead)?

Anni Albers

Anni Albers

SO many: Anni Albers, Eva LeWitt, Yayoi Kusama, the quilters of Gees Bend, and Sigrid Calon come to mind. My friends inspire me constantly, Jen Hewett’s beautiful floral patterns always delight me, and Laure Joliet’s photos capture so much magic. I’m lucky to be surrounded by a truly creative community.


Where you can find me: (your website link, social media links)

You can learn more about me on my website, or you can get a peek at what I’m up to this week over on Instagram!

Designer Spotlight: Jessica Hogarth

HELLO, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF:

Hey! I’m Jessica Hogarth from Whitby, a picturesque fishing town on the North Yorkshire coast of England. I spend my days working from my studio on the east side of the town, and my free time socialising with friends and playing hockey! My coastal upbringing has had a big influence on my work and I love being so close to the sea. 

HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE SURFACE PATTERN DESIGNER/ILLUSTRATOR?

Since I began my degree in Printed Textiles and Surface Pattern Design I have been very passionate about illustration and surface pattern, but I wasn’t focused on art during my upbringing despite taking a fine art A level. I was sporty and musical, and after studying one semester of classical music I left to reassess my options and I discovered the surface pattern course. Looking back on my A level work, it was always quite pattern led, but since I didn’t really plan on following an artistic career I had no idea just how many different types of creative courses were out there until I started looking for them! 

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY/WEEK LOOK LIKE FOR YOU?

My weeks are really varied, depending on deadlines and how many emails I have coming in. At some point you can guarantee I will be packing orders, doing some accounting, utilising social media and responding to emails. The odd week does go by where I don’t even pick up a pen to draw, but that is happening less and less which is good! 

IF YOU COULD GIVE YOUR 10 YEARS YOUNGER SELF ONE KEY PIECE OF ADVICE OR AN INSIGHT, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Homesickness subsides eventually! It took me quite a while to settle in to university life but by the end of third year I didn’t want to leave! I definitely feel like I made the most of my time studying, but I wish I had worried less at the beginning. 

WHEN YOU FEEL STUCK OR IN A DESIGN RUT, HOW DO YOU GET YOURSELF OUT OF IT AND BACK ON TRACK?

Taking a break is definitely necessary for me. I find it hard to work when surrounded by clutter, which is something I have only recently realised. I tidy up my work space when I am feeling in a rut, take a break from looking at my work and come back to it hopefully with a fresh pair of eyes later. 

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN TOOLS?

Definitely paper and my 0.38 muji pens. Other than that, I sometimes use ink and brushes for creating little patterns, but the colouring of my artwork is done on Adobe Illustrator, so I definitely need a scanner, my computer and wacom tablet! 

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PROCESS? 

My design process is fairly simple. All of my illustrations begin as black pen on paper before they are scanned in to the computer. I occasionally tidy them up in Photoshop, but all of the colouring is done in Illustrator. I also use this program to put illustrations in to repeat, or decide on the final layout for a piece of work. When I was at university I was a little more experimental, but this way of working has been successful for me, and it feels like the most natural way to create my art. Other than that my favourite app is Instagram. It’s addictive and I spend more time on there than I probably should! 

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN PROJECTS TO DATE?

I was thrilled to work with the RNLI in 2014, when I created multiple fish illustrations and patterns for use across a variety of textile and stationery products. 

A different but really fun project was designing the art for a salad bowl used in a giveaway by Florette. My face went on to the packaging of salad bags in shops across the UK, and winners won a contemporary bowl, with the illustrations on it done by me! 

Repeat pattern is my passion, so it’s a pleasure to be collaborating with UK based company Deva Designs. I have created every day and Christmas art for them since 2014. The designs are put on to gift wrap and bags and sold in independent outlets across the UK, as well as some high street stores including Waterstones and John Lewis. 

WHO ARE YOUR DREAM CLIENTS OR WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PROJECT?

 I worked with the Wall Street Journal a couple of years ago, and created an illustration for an article in their Mansion magazine. I would love to create more work for editorial. I’d also love to work with Anthropologie (who wouldn’t?!) and Fishs Eddy, to create some quirky illustrations for their homewares. 

THERE HAS BEEN AN ART SUPPLY SANCTION IMPOSED AND DESIGNERS ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO POSSESS 3 ITEMS/TOOLS, WHAT DO YOU CHOOSE?

Loads of paper, pen and ink.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

Here, there are everywhere! I love getting out and about, and think being out of the four walls of my studio is good for getting creative ideas going. When I am in work I like to use Pinterest to look at visually exciting work, which always makes me feel inspired to get creative myself and push my own ideas.

WHO WOULD YOU SAY THE GREATEST DESIGNER IS?

That is an impossible question to answer! I love everything that Anna Bond of Rifle Paper Co is about so I am going to say her if I must pick one, but really there are loads I could mention.

WHEN I'M LONG GONE:

I hope people remember me for being a happy and thoughtful person.  

Designer Spotlight: Puck Selders

HELLO, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF:

Hi!

I’m Puck Selders, a freelance designer and illustrator living in Leiderdorp, the Netherlands, with my partner and 2 wonderful children. 
I love all things cute, children´s books, dancing mambo, theatre, the beach, being outside, art, fashion and everything food related :D

 

For as long as I can remember I've been passionate about drawing, painting, fabrics and beautiful colors. 
I studied Fashion and Textile design at The Royal Academy of Arts, The Hague. 
After graduating in 2000 I started working in-house as a babywear designer for several companies. 
In 2013 I became freelance, so that I could focus on surface pattern design and illustration. 
Creating cute and joyful art just makes me really really happy and I´d love to share it with others.

HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE SURFACE PATTERN DESIGNER/ILLUSTRATOR?

Well, when I studied at the art academy, I honestly had no clue about what I wanted. I only knew that I wanted to do ‘’something creative’’ and that I was crazy about fabrics, beautiful colors and drawing. But I didn’t even know I could draw the way I can draw now, until I started working at Sign-D, my first in-house job. I discovered I really loved to create cute and funny illustrations and patterns and learned how to work with computers! I was so afraid of computers during my study, hahaha!

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY/WEEK LOOK LIKE FOR YOU?

That totally depends on if i’m on a commission or not. But Monday is my day off, I spend it with my little one Jimi, he’s 3, so he’s not going to school yet. On Tuesday and Wednesday I’m working all day, most evenings too, when the kids are asleep and if I don’t go to the gym. If I’m on a commission, I also work on thursdays and fridays. If I’m not on a commission I’m working on building my portfolio and trying to get new clients. But each day starts with a large cup of coffee!!

IF YOU COULD GIVE YOUR 10 YEARS YOUNGER SELF ONE KEY PIECE OF ADVICE OR AN INSIGHT, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Be more self- confident!

WHEN YOU FEEL STUCK OR IN A DESIGN RUT, HOW DO YOU GET YOURSELF OUT OF IT AND BACK ON TRACK?

I’ll do something totally different, like going to the gym or doing the dishes. Something that clears my head. Or, I’ll take my paint and pencils and have some fun with that, just without thinking or any pressure, making some simple stripes , dots or structures.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN TOOLS?

My Wacom tablet and pen.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PROCESS? 

Sometimes I make some little doodles and sketches with pencil and paper. Without looking for reference first, just using my imagination. Scan it into Illustrator and work from there. But mostly I start gathering reference first (not too much!) and then just start drawing in Illustrator, I do have a lot of fantasy so ideas just appear while drawing. I usually draw way too much icons, hahaha. 

Favourite program: Illustrator. Favourite Apps: Instagram and Pinterest

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN PROJECTS TO DATE?

I recently designed some colouring pages for Zeeman, so much fun! I also designed artwork with a circus theme for Zeeman, they create a lot of cool products with it, like toys, greeting cards, stickers.

WHO ARE YOUR DREAM CLIENTS OR WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PROJECT?

I’d love to see my work in Paperchase! Or design tableware for Rice! Land of Nod, Lilipinso…also on my list. But just as long as I can draw cute things I’m happy!

THERE HAS BEEN AN ART SUPPLY SANCTION IMPOSED AND DESIGNERS ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO POSSESS 3 ITEMS/TOOLS, WHAT DO YOU CHOOSE?

Laptop, tablet and pen.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

Everywhere! Nature, food, just a combination of colors, my kids, watching dancers, Instagram and Pinterest. But also sad things, like when my sis was diagnosed with cancer last year. She asked me to design a card for here so I did..

WHO WOULD YOU SAY THE GREATEST DESIGNER IS?

Tough question! Can’t name just one designer, but lately I’m absolutely in love with Noëlle Smit’s work, a dutch illustrator, so colorful!

Working Ways | Designer Spotlight Interview with Lauren Lowen

In this interview, we catch up with Artist Illustrator, Lauren Lowen. She currently focuses on licensing and art for products. Known for her "Offbeat Characters" and patterns, Lauren is represented by the wonderful, Jennifer Nelson Artists.  

In this interview we get to hear about where she works, how she got to where she is now and some of her favourite projects and influences. 

Watch below or you can also listen to the podcast

 

Video Designer Spotlight: Brooke Glaser

Grab a cuppa and tune in for this week's Designer Spotlight with Illustrator & Surface Designer, Brooke Glaser.

We talk about where Brooke finds inspiration, her design process and have a good old catch up!

Watch the video below, or play the podcast: www.risedesignandshine.com/podcasts/

 

Designer Spotlight: Sophie Dufresne

HELLO, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF:

My name is Sophie Dufresne, I am an illustrator and surface pattern designer operating under the name Sophiequi. Originally from Montreal, I live in Los Angeles and find a lot of inspiration in Southern California’s incredible vegetation.

HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE SURFACE PATTERN DESIGNER/ILLUSTRATOR?

Up until a few years ago I didn’t even know it was a profession, but looking back I can see there were early signs of interest in it when decorating ceramic pots or sewing pillows and curtains. And I could get lost for hours in fabric stores looking at patterns. At that time I did very different things in my career since I studied engineering, but computers and programming brought me to design and eventually I discovered I could merge my experience in design and love of art by doing illustration. The introduction to surface pattern design happened with my first MATS class 3 years ago.

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY/WEEK LOOK LIKE FOR YOU?

I start each day by doing a few minutes of pilates with a Youtube video and then I eat my breakfast while watching late night comedy clips, because I find daily laughter is just as important as exercise. Then after a short walk and shower I spend most of the day in my office. Every week I make a todo list and try to balance business and creative tasks. Because the best time to reach art directors and potential clients is early in the week that’s when I research companies and email samples of my work. After that I can dedicate more time to working on assignments and creating new work. I’m still trying to work out a good schedule and strategy for social media but it usually happens whenever I have time, on a lunch break or late at night. When there’s a class going on I also spend time engaging with the facebook group, which is a great place to be inspired and exchange tips.

IF YOU COULD GIVE YOUR 10 YEARS YOUNGER SELF ONE KEY PIECE OF ADVICE OR AN INSIGHT, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

To start working on goals sooner and make little steps now instead of waiting for the perfect time to get going. Ten years ago making art for a living was a distant dream and I can be proud of how far I’ve come since then, but I waited until I had all the elements in place to get serious and then expected everything to happen at once. Learning to be patient and progress steadily towards my goals has been a big lesson for me.

WHEN YOU FEEL STUCK OR IN A DESIGN RUT, HOW DO YOU GET YOURSELF OUT OF IT AND BACK ON TRACK?

It depends where I am in the process when it happens. If I get stuck in the middle of a project then usually taking a walk outside, or some other kind of break or activity will help me approach the design from a new angle when I come back to it. If I’m in an inspiration rut then looking at a lot of images from a variety of sources or reading books will help spark new connections and ideas. Sometimes also the block can come from having too much expectations of what the work should be. In that case I trick myself to get started by pretending I’ll just do a silly sketch for 2 minutes, that I won’t keep or show anyone, and often I’ll continue developing way beyond that 2 minutes and end up with something usable.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN TOOLS?

Photoshop, occasionally Illustrator, iPad Pro and Pencil, ink, gouache, and watercolor.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PROCESS? 

For illustrations I usually start with a sketch. It can be very rough, as long as it’s enough to establish the idea. Then I’ll brainstorm colors digitally either in Photoshop or Procreate. 4 Sometimes I finish the whole drawing digitally but often I’ll paint elements by hand and scan them in to get natural textures. With patterns it’s a more organic process. I’ll start by painting directly a bunch of elements often without even a sketch or a set plan as to how they’ll come together. Then I’ll scan, clean up, adjust colors and design the pattern all in Photoshop. My favorite app to work with Photoshop on the iPad is Astropad. And although I don’t work in Illustrator as often as in Photoshop I do like to use it sometimes for patterns because the pattern tool and ability to change colors with one click are pretty fantastic.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN PROJECTS TO DATE?

One is a boxed notes projects I did with Papyrus, which just came out in stores ( https:// www.papyrusonline.com/graphic-pineapple-boxed-thank-you-notes-set-of-14 ). It was so exciting to receive the samples this week! I had done the original sketch for this pineapple in my first MATS class but never used it then colored it over a year later in another class for a mini exercise. I never thought it would turn into a license project!

Another fun project I did was toddler t-shirt designs for a children boutique in my neighborhood. Originally it was just the mermaid design (https://entertainingelephants.com/ collections/tops/products/mermaid-tee-1) and then a year later we added a narwhal (https:// entertainingelephants.com/collections/tops/products/octopus-crop-tee) and an octopus design to the collection (https://entertainingelephants.com/collections/tops/products/octopus-lap-tee). The shirts were screen printed locally and it was a great experience to learn how to prepare files for the screens. The designs were done in Illustrator.

WHO ARE YOUR DREAM CLIENTS OR WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PROJECT?

In the stationary/publishing market there are many companies I would just love to work with: TeNeues, Chronicle Books, Paperchase, Red Cap Cards, and Studio Oh! to name a few. Illustrating for magazines like Flow, Real Simple, The Simple Things, and Frankie would be pretty great too. I would also enjoy designing home product like dishes or a bedding set, and things to wear like bags and shirts, and of course it would be a dream to do that with Urban Outfitters or Anthropologie. In the meantime, there is always the option to start with print on demand sites.

THERE HAS BEEN AN ART SUPPLY SANCTION IMPOSED AND DESIGNERS ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO POSSESS 3 ITEMS/TOOLS, WHAT DO YOU CHOOSE?

I could say my iPad Pro, Pencil, and power supply, but that would be cheating because with that I could simulate any materials ;). So I choose gouache, brushes, and good quality paper.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

Pinterest, Google images, books, walks around the neighborhood are all good source for reference materials. To come up with ideas sometimes I start by reading on a subject or browsing the web for some words and seeing where it takes me. Or I can start with a prompt and then add related elements as I go. Lately I’ve been experimenting with blindly making a few marks on paper and then making a drawing out of it by letting my pen do the thinking.

WHO WOULD YOU SAY THE GREATEST DESIGNER IS?

The greatest designer to have lived is probably Nature itself! But jokes aside I have liked Marimekko’s designs since I was a kid, and love that she creates also clothing and accessories. In the same vein of colorful graphic style Alexander Girard is also pretty great, I love his wooden characters. 

WHEN I'M LONG GONE:

I hope people remember me as someone they liked being around and for pushing the boundaries in whatever I tried to do.

Where you can find me:

website: www.sophiequi.com

instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sophiequi/

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/likesophiequi/

twitter: https://twitter.com/sophiequi

pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/sophiequi/

Designer Spotlight: Elizabeth Silver

Hello, please introduce yourself:

Hi, I'm a surface pattern designer Elizabeth Silver. I live on the east coast of the US, in Raleigh, North Carolina and I was an in-house textile designer for about 10 years before going freelance in 2012. Since then I've branched out into stationery, dinnerware, party paper and a bit of everything else, but no matter the substrate, I'll always be a pattern girl at heart!

 

If you could give your 10 years younger self one key piece of advice or an insight, what would it be?

'Just because it isn't easy doesn't mean you're not doing a good job.'

I've been exceedingly lucky in my life to have had the opportunity to study surface pattern design, get a job in my field right out of school, and be a valued member of all the design departments I've been a part of. Getting into freelancing and licensing has been a much slower build to success markers than I was really prepared for, despite working harder than I ever used to. I've been able to persevere and continue to have a positive attitude, confident that eventually I'll get where I'm going, but a younger Elizabeth Silver may not have been so optimistic.

When you feel stuck or in a design rut, how do you get yourself out of it and back on track?

I'd love to say I take a walk in the park and come back inspired and recharged, but the truth is, I think of myself as a designer more than an artist, and so much of my process is just about moving forward. When I feel like things aren't coming together the way I wish they were, I take a break from the project if I can, re-assess with fresh eyes, and also try to keep it in perspective. Not every design is going to be my favorite. All I can do is my best for that day or that design and press on.

What are your favourite design tools? 

A sketchbook, mechanical pencil, my Wacom tablet, Adobe Illustrator and the internet pretty much cover all the bases for me.

How would you describe your design process?

I go into my process and favorite resources in real detail in my new atly course (all about designing a licensing collection) but in short, my process is that of a true left-brained creative. I usually start with lists. My sketchbook is 30% writing and 70% drawing.

As far as apps go, Pinterest is a great place to gather and keep my references and inspiration and while I consider myself lucky to be equally proficient at Photoshop and Illustrator, I prefer Illustrator for my own work, because editing later for licensing clients tends to be much easier.

What have been some of your favourite design projects to date?

When I worked in-house as the print stylist for babyGap, besides the adorable patterns for 0-24 month olds, I was also in charge of designing the prints for boys underwear each season. At the time, that was a large category where I illustrated all types of novelty prints that made me smile. Essentially I spent my days drawing dinosaurs on skateboards and robot sharks, and really, what's more fun than that?


More recently, I've enjoyed expanding on and remixing some of my favorite collections to design art coasters for Studio M.

Who are your dream clients or what is your dream project

I'd love to have a capsule collection with Target, a line of home décor or stationery or both with my patterns and name all over it.

Where do you find inspiration?

I do a bi-monthly market trend board for my newsletter, so I am regularly scouring shopping sites, blogs, and instagram for that endeavor. It's been a great way to soak up ideas without focusing on how those trends apply to my style and work. A lack of focus while researching keeps me current without being too derivative.

When I'm long gone, I hope people remember me as:

Charismatic and colorful.

Designer Spotlight: JILLIAN PHILLIPS

HELLO, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF:

Hi! I'm Jill, I'm an illustrator and print designer based in the UK.

IF YOU COULD GIVE YOUR 10 YEARS YOUNGER SELF ONE KEY PIECE OF ADVICE OR AN INSIGHT, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Don't worry so much! Work hard and it will eventually come together.

 

WHEN YOU FEEL STUCK OR IN A DESIGN RUT, HOW DO YOU GET YOURSELF OUT OF IT AND BACK ON TRACK?

I surround myself with design books or visit an art exhibition. A day out in a new city can really lift the creative spirit too.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN TOOLS?

I love to paint with ink. 

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PROCESS? FAVOURITE APPS AND PROGRAMS

I try not to look at what everybody else is doing when I am working on a new print- but I do love to look at Instagram in my down time. There are so many lovely creative people out there.

My own process involves spending time looking at books, sketching, filling pages in my sketchbook (if time permits) and then starting to put the design together in Illustrator or Photoshop.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN PROJECTS TO DATE?

I've been lucky to be involved in some great projects. I love designing fabric for Dashwood Studio. Land of Nod are also really fun to work with. I still get excited when I walk into a Paperchase store and see my artwork on product too!

WHO ARE YOUR DREAM CLIENTS OR WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PROJECT?

Oh gosh, so many. I've always liked the idea of designing bedding for Ikea. Anthropologie would also be high on my list!

THERE HAS BEEN AN ART SUPPLY SANCTION IMPOSED AND DESIGNERS ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO POSSESS 3 ITEMS/TOOLS, WHAT DO YOU CHOOSE?

Ink, brush and paper is all I need to be happy!

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

Tokyo, Stockholm, Copenhagen and London.

WHO WOULD YOU SAY THE GREATEST DESIGNER IS?

There are so many great designers!!

When I’m long gone, I hope people remember me as a designer whose work made people smile.

Where you can find me:

www.jillyp.co.uk  

instagram:  jillyp_studio

 

 

Designer Spotlight: Adriana Bergstrom

HELLO, PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF:

Hi, I'm Adriana Bergstrom (Adriprints).

IF YOU COULD GIVE YOUR 10 YEARS YOUNGER SELF ONE KEY PIECE OF ADVICE OR AN INSIGHT, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Don't worry so much about figuring out your style! Just keep making loads and loads of
art. Life's full of ups and downs regardless of the career you choose.

WHEN YOU FEEL STUCK OR IN A DESIGN RUT, HOW DO YOU GET YOURSELF OUT OF IT AND BACK ON TRACK?

I try and do something completely different... I tend to vacillate between digital and
analog art as a mixed media artist, so I hit up some new analog or digital mediums...
new brush (real or digital), paper, etc. Or I really do something completely different and
get out of the studio to change the view.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN TOOLS?

I love ink and also digital ink. So, my dipping pen, brush pens, and also my Intuos tablet,
and Cintiq.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN PROCESS? FAVOURITE APPS AND PROGRAMS

I tend to sketch in graphite or digitally, then move to color again analog or digital. It
really depends on what I've got in mind, but I always end up digitizing the work to touch
up the scan of the texture or illustration before sharing it with clients or social media.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN PROJECTS TO DATE?

still love the fonts I designed, although some are in need of re-kerning. Other from
those, I'd really love to see more of my work out in the world. I love my latest Autumn
designs and funky characters.

WHO ARE YOUR DREAM CLIENTS OR WHAT IS YOUR DREAM PROJECT?

I'd love to work with mini-Boden and see my work on children's wear. Another dream of
mine would be to see my more illustrative work in a library in a children's book or two...
or five.

THERE HAS BEEN AN ART SUPPLY SANCTION IMPOSED AND DESIGNERS ARE ONLY ALLOWED TO POSSESS 3 ITEMS/TOOLS, WHAT DO YOU CHOOSE?

Ink, brush, paper

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

I get inspiration from the weird thoughts that bubble up in my brain during showers,
right before falling asleep, and during travel. When I'm stuck at home for a long time, I
get inspiration from my surroundings, books I'm reading, podcasts or audiobooks I'm
absorbing.

WHO WOULD YOU SAY THE GREATEST DESIGNER IS?

Hah! This is such a loaded question... just one designer? Alas, I cannot. My faves are
William Morris, Alfons Mucha, Josef Frank, and Maija Isola.

When I’m long gone, I hope people remember me as an ecclectic Renaissance woman.

Listen While You Work - Designer Spotlight: Jeanetta Gonzales

I had the pleasure of interviewing the very talented licensed artist, graphic designer and artist coach, Jeanetta Gonzales and picked her brains on everything from finding inspiration to getting out of a design rut. 


More from Jeanetta

You can find Jeanetta on the following links:

http://jeanettagonzales.com

http://instagram.com/nettdesigns

Thanks for watching, feel free to get in touch if you have any questions or comment below.